the evolution of a sack, in two parts

This story begins in March, when I had neither time nor willingness to work on fitting new patterns. And I thought, “I could use a sack dress, I think.” Enter a smallish piece of green crepe (polyester or silk — no clue, I bought it for a song second-hand) and an issue of Szycie aka the Polish edition of Patrones from June 2017.

Patrones_6_2017_21

Dress #21 fit the bill: it is, essentially, a sleeveless sack with an elasticated waist. What the photo and the drawing don’t show is that the neckline dips much lower on the back than the front, which made it exactly the opposite of what I wanted. Since there are no darts or any other shaping to speak of, I sapped the pattern pieces.

Patrones is chock-full of high street inspiration, and most of the patterns are on the simple side. Unfortunately, only every other size is included on the pattern sheets (usually 38-42-46 in the regular range and 48-52-56 in the plus size range). For me, this means tracing between the sizes, which is no problem with a pattern as simple as this one but, I imagine, could get pretty challenging with a more complicated pattern.

I really had very little fabric, but with single-layer cutting, and a pieced back I ended up with a sack I quite like:

greensack1

My one reservation is that the armholes are so big on this pattern — and I both added a seam allowance and raised them slightly — that I can’t wear this without a blouse underneath.

 

I skipped the elastic and made a belt and belt loops instead.

And then I fiddled with the pattern a bit more. I added cuffed kimono sleeves, split the front and back pattern pieces into two, and added elastic and pockets.

My inspiration was the Staple Dress from April Rhodes and pattern 6509 from Burda.

blue_patrones3

blue_patrones1

The fabric is a rather unimpressive crinkle polyester from JoAnn Fabrics. I liked the color of the wrong side: a nice saturated matte cornflower blue, so it became the right side. Which means the inside of this dress is embarrassingly shiny.

I think this version deserves another try, in a fabric that breathes. I’m thinking, rayon.

Do you like sack dresses? What are your favorite easy to sew and wear patterns? (And did I hear you say Inari from Named?)

 

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