Sewing the Seventies: My Vintage Patterns

Hello! I have no new sewing content to share, since my recent output consists of dutifully made t-shirts from patterns I’ve already written about. So I figured it’s a good time for a bit of an eye candy post.

Here are some ’70s patterns I picked up from various sources — and mostly for a steal. With one exception (scroll down to the bottom of the post), they’re all waiting to be made. I guess, in a way, it’s a post about my laziness as much as about ’70s eye candy.

First up: a pattern for jeans with an envelope illustration I love. I wish I were as cool as these ladies (and could reliably wear white shirts…).

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I think the size marked on it actually makes sense when you consult the back of the envelope as it has no relationship to contemporary Vogue Patterns sizing (I think…). It hasn’t mattered yet because I’m too scared to make jeans.

Next: Glamorous dress reminiscent of the recent Vogue Patterns hit (this one). I both love it and am consumed by worry that it’s too boob-tastic for me to actually wear.

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The illustration style on the envelope for this shirt pattern looks ’70s tilting into the ’80s to me. Maybe it’s the perm on the lady in the middle? I like views A and B (I’d like them more if I knew how to figure out a broad back adjustment for raglan sleeves). View C is the stuff of clown nightmares for me. Get away from me, oh bloodthirsty one!

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Now, this is a real thrifting score — it came in a ziplock bag of mostly ’80s patterns for $1. I like the lapels. There’s a softness to this blazer that really appeals to me.

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Another one from the same bag — this one is from 1980 so, depending on whether you’re a glass half-full or half-empty person, either the last year of the 1970s or a launch into the ’80s. I like the simplicity of this design, but I’m not sure what would be “extra-sure” about it. A jacket for your clairvoyant needs.

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Finally, one I made, though with some changes. Would make again.

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Any tips for me as far as making the leap from admiring to sewing goes? You may have noticed, the sizing on these is all over the place, which gives me yet another reason to procrastinate.

What ’70s patterns do you have in your stash?

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Sewing the Seventies: My Plan

I’m that person who posted about not really joining sewing/knitting/photo challenges, right? Just confirming. I am indeed that person. But I’m also currently participating in the Burda Challenge and now… I want to Sew the Seventies. I guess, eventually, the challenges find you šŸ˜‰

I discovered Sewing the Seventies last year — too late to join, but not too late to enjoy the Steely Seamstress’ posts (scroll through for last year’s posts). Seventies’ fashion reminds of my dad’s craziest clothes, which I only know from photos and his stories. It was also the time my dad learned to sew — taught by his friend’s dad. For him this new skill set meant inventions such as secret pockets for ciggies on a pant leg and refashioning regular pants to make them flared when flares were hard to buy but everyone else seemed to have a pair…

For me, dad’s sewing meant awesome doll clothes during my — very intense — Barbie phase. Later, life got too busy and dad stopped sewing. Much later, I learned to sew myself, thanks to Craftsy and YouTube, and blogs, and books…

My aim with this challenge is to time-travel a little.

burda70sWhile I’ve scored a few authentic 1970’s patterns along the way, I find myself drawn to one particular dress that I found in aĀ Burda VintageĀ special issue I got as a gift.

The more I looked at the dress, the more I realized how much it looked like a crazy dress my grandma (dad’s mom) owned when I was little. By that point, the dress had been retired to the depths of her closet and I would dig it up for dress-up parties with the neighbors’ kids. My grandma would have worn it to parties in the mid-70s.

The cut was, to tiny me, the height of sleek sophistication, paired with a fabric that today’s me would honestly callĀ bonkers. When you’re about five, nothing beats a combination like that. The dress was green, printed with a pattern of majestic white storks with red beaks and red legs. It was everything. Even if it was — and it surely was — polyester.

If I could find a similar fabric, I’d sew a replica of that dress. (Maybe that’s a fabric designing and printing challenge for the future, come to think of it?)

For now, I think, I’ll make it in a more subdued navy poly print that’s been sitting in my stash for a while.

Without further ado, here’s the pattern:

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The Donna dress fromĀ Burda VintageĀ 1970s issue 3/2016

What puzzles me about the dress is that the sample is sewn up in a sequined jersey but the recommended fabric is embroidered silk?… If I’m reading between the lines correctly, it’s more likely drafted for a woven than a knit fabric. There is a zipper in the back and neck darts.

I think the simplest answer right now is make a muslin.

I’ll keep you posted.

In the meantime, here’s the Steely Seamstress’ post about this year’s challenge and her first challenge garment: a beautiful popover shirt in Liberty lawn.

Think you’ll join in?

vintage starting point

For $2 this dream in an envelope was mine.

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I wanted it all: the unforced coolness, the espadrilles, the white shirt. I even pondered the minimalist turban action on the lady on the right.

What I definitely didn’t have was “waist size 24.”

But it really didn’t matter in the case of this wonderfully easy pattern. I was able to improvise based on what my fabric allowed and got a perfectly wearable skirt out of it.

Unfortunately, there was no copyright date on the envelope, so I’m left guesstimating the publication as 1970-something? It’s a single-size pattern that uses the waist circumference (in inches, obvs) as the pattern size. The stitching lines are marked on the pattern, which is kind of nice… but given that it’s easier to mark within 5/8″ all around your pattern than to figure out other sizes from a single size, I’d still say my preference would be for multi-size patterns.

I approached the single-size pattern scientifically, that is, with a ruler and tape measure. The waist and hips were roomy enough, and I was able to finagle an additional inch on each pattern piece so as not to deflate the gathering (plus, plenty more inches on the waistband…).

You might be able to see in the drawings that the skirt panels have a somewhat unusual shape. They have a pronounced extension for the pockets and the pocket pieces are very small. While serging those panels was a bit challenging, I have to say that this design really hides your pockets well. It’s a good design idea that I might use in other patterns.

I gave you a preview in the post about the Burda top, but here’s the skirt again.

I resisted the call of the turban and made Skirt B in a poly-crepe remnant from my stash.

I decided to leave off the ties and, trying the skirt on with the waistband in progress, I also decided to shave some height off there.

Details:
Pattern:
undated Butterick 4727.
Fabric: poly crepe remnant left over from this dress.
Notions: thread, 7″ zipper, button for the waistband.
Construction details: topstitching on the waistband, serged seams, lapped zipper, hand-stitched invisible hem.
Fun fact:Ā the pocket design is really clever!

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Back waistband in close-up

Pattern verdict:Ā Worth hunting down if you’re into pretty pattern envelopes and easy sewing.

Do you have any tips for sewing with vintage patterns? Or any vintage patterns you’re looking to hunt down?